Friday, December 27, 2013

Prevention of Heartworm Disease In Cats

Heartworm disease is a serious, potentially life threatening disease in cats. The disease is transmitted by infected mosquitoes that bite the cat and inject the larvae of the heartworm parasite. In the cat, these larvae mature into heartworms in about 6 months. This transmission has to happen through the mosquito to the cat, not from cat to cat. The worms infect the blood vessels of the lungs and heart, causing damage.

 

Heartworm Disease In Cats
There is no treatment approved by the FDA in the United States to treat heartworm disease in cats. The only therapy is supportive, in an attempt to help the cat survive the disease, which lasts 2 to 3 years.

The FDA has approved 4 treatments to prevent heartworm disease in cats: Heartguard for Cats, an oral tablet by Merial. Interceptor, an oral tablet by Novartis. Revolution, a topical by Pfizer. Advantage Multi for Cats, a topical by Bayer.

These 4 treatments do not prevent the infection of the cat by the larvae from the mosquitoes. The treatments kill the larvae in the cat when they are in a particular part of their 6 month life cycle, before they mature into heartworms. Ideally heartworm prevention should be given all year, since the success of the medication depends on killing the larvae at a particular part of its life cycle. Also mosquitoes can survive the cold months indoors and carry the infection to indoor cats even in the winter.

Giving the cat the heartworm prevention monthly should be as easy as possible.

The tablets need to be given with food so they can be absorbed and ideally they should be chewed up. The tablets can be divided into 4 pieces and mixed in with food. Usually reducing the amount of food at that meal and making sure the cat is hungry will let the medication be eaten without being noticed. Some cats like the taste of the tablets and look at them as a treat but they still need to be given with food. If the cat would vomit the meal, contact your vet for instructions on when to give the cat another dose of heartworm prevention.

The topical medications are placed behind the neck. This requires pushing back the fur and squeezing out the liquid directly onto the skin. The manufacturers recommend not getting the liquid on your hands or touching the cat for 2 hours. The medication is placed behind the neck so the cat cannot groom the area. If you have multiple cats, the cat getting treatment must be isolated from the other cats for 2 hours. This prevents them from grooming each other. These topical medications have the advantage of protecting against many other parasites other than just heartworms.

Heartworm disease in cats is widespread, life threatening, and preventable. Please protect your precious companions!

At cattreeparadise.com [http://www.cattreeparadise.com] we adore cats. We have a cat info page on the web site dedicated to articles that will improve the quality of your cat's life. The articles are reviewed by a veterinarian, William Neumann DVM. Also we offer the most creative cat trees that will satisfy your cat's instinctive yearnings. We provide free shipping, a 100% satisfaction guarantee, and great customer service. Our web site, cattreeparadise.com is your best online source for quality cat trees.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7099823

Friday, December 20, 2013

Cat Heating Pad - Nice Solution For Cat Owners

Do you have a cat? Sometimes get annoyed by their inappropriate favorite sleeping places? Yes, every cat owner must know that they really like warm places, but these habit sometimes can be inconvenient because it is possible that they may sleep in a wrong place, for example: on top of the television, on the bed, in the car, even behind the refrigerator or sometimes, extremely, inside the microwave.
 

Cat Heating Pad
But now, this annoying habit can now be reduced, even eliminated with a device called Cat Heating Pad. A Heating Pad is a place or an electric heated pad that make your cat is able to sleep and curl up comfortably. This Pad size has been adjusted properly so that the cat's body will not become uncomfortable.

There are two types of Cat Heating Pads: Indoor Pad and Outdoor Cat Pad. For Indoor a Warming Pad, some of them is electronically operated, while some of them are using the heat energy from other objects such as ovens, microwaves, or televisions. While for Outdoor Cat Warming Pad, may gain heat from sunlight or the surface where the pad is placed.

If you are the type of person that truly enjoys spoiling your feline companion, then you may consider one of these as a necessary item.

Do not hesitate to use this tool, it is guaranteed safe, your pet would be more calm and it will avoid the damage of your valuables, or your television because your cat already find a warm place to curl and sleep.

Stacy really loves her home and family and lives life to the full and has been writing about her knowledge and experience. Feel free to see some of her material at Small Safe [http://smallsafe.net]
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3705546

Sunday, December 8, 2013

LaPerm Cat Breed

The LaPerm is a rex breed which originated in the United States and is now present in many other countries worldwide. The breed is genetically unique and not related to any other rex cat varieties, having a dominant gene causing their curly coats. They have an elegant and athletic build and are affectionate, active and outgoing in character. They are reputed to be hypoallergenic cats, provoking a significantly lower level of allergic response in humans than normal cats. Their most significant feature is their coat, which is made up of soft waves, curls and ringlets, resembling a shaggy perm.
 

LaPerm
The LaPerm is in many ways a cat of moderation with no extremes and is still true to its original type. It does however have a striking appearance because of its unusual coat. The breed standard describes a muscular foreign-type body, which is medium in size with longish legs and neck. The head is a modified wedge with gently rounded contours and a muzzle which slightly broad of the wedge. In profile the straight nose leads into a gentle break between the eyes up to a flattish forehead. LaPerms also have rather broad noses. Their flared ears are placed to follow the line of the face, while their almond shaped eyes are medium large and expressive.

Like other rexes, all colors and patterns are acceptable,although tabbies, reds and torties are well represented reflecting their origins. Also the unusual colors from the early days of the breed have been selected for, so lilac, chocolate and colorpoints are popular. Tabby points are especially attractive. Newer varieties such as ticked tabbies, shadeds and darker points are also being bred. The curl tends to open up the coat showing off shading, ticking or silver undercoats.

The coat itself is described as having a unique textured feel. It is not silky, having a certain drag on the hand like mohair and the texture comes as much from the shape of the curls as from the mixture of different hair types. It should be soft and inviting, although the shorthairs will have more texture to their coats. The coat is rather loose and bouncy often feeling springy when patted, and stands away from the body with no thick undercoat. It is light and airy and judges sometimes blow on the coat to see if it will part. The coat varies according to the season and the maturity of the cat but is essentially wavy or curly all over with the longest and most defined curls in the ruff and on the neck often falling in ringlets. There is also longer curly fur inside the ears, tufts at the ear tips and “ear muffs”, or longer, silky hair on the backs of the ears. The longhairs have a curly plumed tail while the shorthairs have tails rather like bottle brushes, and both have long curled whiskers. Sometimes the coat falls into a natural parting along the back, jokingly referred to as “the parting of the waves”.
Data refer : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaPerm



LaPerm




LaPerm




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Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Devon Rex Cat Breed

The Devon Rex is a breed of intelligent, short-haired cat that emerged in England during the 1960s. They are known for their slender bodies, wavy coat, and large ears. These cats are capable of learning difficult tricks. They are even known to recognize their owner's name, just as they do their own.

The Devon Rex is a breed of cat with a curly, very soft short coat similar to that of the Cornish Rex. They are often associated with being one of the most hypo-allergenic cats available because of their type of coat. However, they are technically not hypoallergenic.
 

Devon Rex
The first Devon was discovered by Beryl Cox in Buckfastleigh, Devon, UK in 1960 amongst a litter of kittens near a disused tin mine. The breed was initially thought to be linked with the Cornish Rex; however, test mating proved otherwise. Cats have three types of hair: guard hair, awn hair, and down hair. The Devon Rex's coat is unusual because there is little guard hair (see Cornish Rex and Sphynx for more information on hair-deficient genetics in cats).

The curl in Devon Rex fur is caused by a different mutation and gene than that of the Cornish Rex and German Rex, and breeding of a Devon with either of those cats results in cats without rexed (curled) fur. Devons, which are medium sized cats, are often called "pixie cats" or "alien cats" because of their unique appearance. Their uncommonly large, slightly rounded ears are set low on the sides of their wide heads, their eyes are large, and their noses are slightly upturned. Unlike most cats, their whiskers are very short and often curled to such an extent that it may appear as if they have no whiskers. Their body type is distinctly lightly built. Their long, sturdy legs are well suited for long leaps, and their toes are unusually large.
Data refer : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devon_Rex



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Devon Rex




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Sunday, December 1, 2013

Dog And Cat Diarrhea - Cause And Treatment Of This Indelicate Subject

When your dog or cat has diarrhea, you want to know why and have the information for what to do and how to treat it. Most cases of acute diarrhea can be handled at home if the symptoms respond well to minimal treatment. Testing to determine the origin is unnecessary. Keep children away from sick dogs, clean messes carefully, and wash thoroughly after handling sick dogs.
 

Cat Diarrhea
Dogs commonly have bouts of acute diarrhea.

Acute diarrhea is when the dog has an abnormal stool that is softer than normal, watery, soft-formed, or soft with abnormal color or very smelly; or when the dog strains to defecate and only passes gas.

There are effective natural remedies.

There are effective natural remedies to support healthy firm stools and maintain "stable stomachs" -- promoting healthy digestion and bowel functioning as well as healthy levels of digestive gas in dogs and cats. Natural treatments for cat and dog diarrhea include probiotics, glutamine, and herbs like slippery elm and plantains.

Diarrhea can result from sudden changes in the dog or cat diet, or when the pet eats something it cannot absorb. It can result from motion sickness or travel stress. Other causes include pancreatitis, parasites such as the Giardia Protozoa and Coccidia (very common invaders of puppies and kittens), Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever), feline distemper virus, bacteria, toxins, and antibiotics. When dogs are unsupervised they are prone to ingest things including sticks, stones and various scavenged items that do not agree with them. The result can be a dog with a case of diarrhea. Don't be alarmed if your dog is acting reasonably well; in most cases the dog's diarrhea is a healthy reaction to help it heal, and not a disease.

It would also not be unusual for a dog (or anyone) with diarrhea to feel "under the weather", so your dog may appear a bit "off" until the diarrhea is resolved. Acute small intestinal diarrhea can be managed by not feeding for 24-48 hours but water must be given, and it is beneficial to add a probiotic powder to the dog's water.

If diarrhea stops, feed small amounts of bland low-fat food 3 to 6 times daily for a few days - foods such as home-cooked boiled hamburger, cottage cheese, tofu with boiled rice, and 100% pure canned pumpkin (NOT pumpkin pie filling with sugars and spices). Most dogs love the flavor of pumpkin. Pumpkin is a unique fiber that regulates the bowel. Be aware, it will color the stool. Foods designed as intestinal diets usually contain rice which is more digestible than other grains. Gradually increase the amount fed in transitioning to the pet's normal diet.

If your canine develops a case of diarrhea and otherwise seems active, content and strong, you can assist the recovery to normal by making some dietary adjustments.

Dogs that have healthy digestive systems are able to eat a variety of foods and that includes raw foods, without resulting diarrhea. Dogs that need to eat a special diet to keep from having diarrhea are not healthy. Do not feed hypoallergenic or bland diets to avoid diarrhea. Find out what the problem is and fix it.

Diagnosis of persistent diarrhea is critical.

Chronic diarrhea is less common and more serious requiring more effort to correct. Diarrhea can be caused by diseases of the small intestine, large intestine or diseases of organs other than the intestinal tract.

If your puppy or kitten has not had its vaccination series and gets diarrhea, call your veterinarian right away. A young puppy with diarrhea usually needs medical attention immediately. Diarrhea can be fatal to puppies under 4 weeks. Green-tinged diarrhea in puppies may indicate Coccidiosis, a parasitic disease that consistently produces diarrhea. Symptoms may include refusal to eat, dehydration, weakness and straining to defecate. See your vet.

Mucus in diarrhea indicates an irritated bowel. Parasites, raw pork hearts and medical conditions can cause mucus in the stool. If the stool is voluminous and continues when you believe the dog should be "empty", call your vet for help in deciding whether you should wait the diarrhea out or make an appointment to have the problem assessed. It may be a bacterial infection.

Diarrhea occurs when an accumulation of dissolved substances in the intestine causes excess water to move into the intestine. This accumulation may be a result of decreased absorption of food, increased secretion of electrolytes by the intestine, or both.

Diarrhea is the dog's body purging itself of harmful or unwanted toxins.


This can be accompanied by vomiting, usually caused by inflammation of the stomach (gastritis), which often happens when dogs eat grass or spoiled food. In some cases of poisoning, vomiting should be induced to get the toxin out of the system as quickly as possible.

If diarrhea is bloody or explosive call your vet. If your dog has a fever or obvious abdominal pain or bloating, this can indicate a serious condition. Contact your vet immediately.

Be sure your pet's fluid intake is maintained, so dehydration does not occur. Dogs with diarrhea can dehydrate quickly. Provide ample fresh water and ensure that your dog is drinking. Dump, wash and refresh the bowl several times daily. Add a probiotic powder to the dog's water, or food. Giving the dog yogurt is soothing but does not provide any significant beneficial bacteria.

If your pet is dehydrated you can usually encourage drinking with a syringe. If your dog is dehydrated and will not drink or is vomiting, call your vet immediately!

We have existed as a company since 1985, but it was a love of dogs, the dogs that have been a part of our life, and the passing of one dog in particular, Rusty, that inspired the creation of [http://www.callofthedog.com] and http://www.CalloftheDogShop.com -- created to provide the things your dogs and pets need. Visit us for great information and quality dog supplies! Be sure to see our About Us page as well.

The two sites are dedicated to the dogs we have loved so deeply, and who have given us so much love in return. Purebreds and mixed breeds, but mostly rescues in need of a home. We educated them, but each one has had something to teach us in exchange.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1034118

Friday, November 15, 2013

Feline Diabetes

Diabetes, or high blood sugar is a metabolic Disease that affects many elder, Heavy felines. Parallel to adult onset diabetes in humans, cat diabetes Comes when the Older cat pancreas no longer produces a sufficient amount insulin or the cells of the felines body lose their capacity to aid it correctly.

There are many Symptoms that indicate diabetes in felines which include, extreme thirst, increased urination, many more trips to the litter box then usual, and starved craving, many times accompanied by extreme weight loss. If your feline develops any of these Signs, see a veterinarian at once. Creating an operational management program for a diabetic feline requires expert experience, whether you go for a traditional or holistic approach. Unless feline diabetes is brought under control, it can cause vomiting, loss of craving, weakness, dehydration, poor dry skin and hair coat, liver disease, many numerous metabolic disturbances, and may possibly ultimately head to death.

 

Feline Diabetes
Numerous veterinarians believe that felines fed a nourishing, appropriate diet from when they are kittens are much less likely to develop feline diabetes. Veterinarians successfully nurse many diabetic animals with a natural diet that they would catch in the wild and with supplements only, without insulin. Cats diabetes is typically managed through prescription type of diets and insulin medications, either injected or taken orally.

One of the keys to triumph in dealing with your diabetic cat is to feed your animal a whole natural food diet and stick with it. Which in essence means no junk and no snacks that alone would be 50 percent of the solution. There is evidence that diabetes is in part a problem of pancreatic insufficiency and of breaking down foods. The use of digestive enzymes is beneficial to enable animals to process food more effectively.

There are elements that have proven benefits against feline diabetes like a combination of chromium, vitamin E, and selenium. Chromium stimulates insulin action. Insulin must initially mingle with chromium in order to effectively release the tissues to glucose and the production of energy. There are experiments that show that insulin is nearly ineffective devoid of sufficient chromium to create energy. Processed cat dry food is typically deficient in chromium. Studies also reveal that chromium supplementation reduces blood sugar. Vitamin E and selenium are valuable antioxidants that can help care for the blood vessels and other tissue from accelerated corrosion impairment caused by lofty blood sugar levels.

An additional valuable mineral nutrient is vanadium in the form of vanadium sulfate. This trace mineral can mimic the property of insulin or build up its efficiency in the felines body, hence tumbling both blood sugar level consistently. You don't want to cause such a harsh drop that you create a hypoglycemic effect that is low blood sugar.

If you found this article helpful and want more information, please go to http://catkinsdiet.com/felinediabetes.html

Brian Fleming has created the website catkinsdiet.com to help cat owners cope with cats that have developed feline diabetes, while teaching others how to properly feed their cats to avoid any health issues in the future.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3724659

Monday, November 11, 2013

Cat Teeth Cleaning Tips

Most people are intimidated when they consider the thought of cleaning their feline's teeth. But fear not, this may be easier than you think. Basically, the subject falls into two categories: preventive maintenance/home care and veterinary dental cleaning.

Let's start with basic home dental care for your kitty. Cleaning cat teeth is best accomplished in prevention, and should be ideally started as a kitten. Even though a kitten's teeth do not need cleaning, you should begin by desensitizing your cat to having your fingers in his mouth by rubbing the gums along the top of his teeth. Do this every 1-2 days. Don't despair if you have an adult cat, they can be trained as well.

 

Doing the finger-in-the-mouth exercises will prepare your cat for the dental care that you can do at home. Basically, there are two schools of thought on this: prevention of plaque by altering the pH of the mouth with a zinc-based product, or actual tooth cleaning with brushing or rubbing the teeth.

First, let's talk about prevention: there are some great products available that actually change the pH in the mouth by using zinc, to keep plaque from forming. These products can be put directly into the cat's mouth on the gum line with an easy swipe of your finger or a cotton swab, or added to the cat's water bowl.

The second technique for cleaning cat teeth at home, is simply brushing them. At little research will uncover scores of cleaning kits that include wands, brushes or finger cots as well as feline approved toothpastes. A combination of these practices used at least 3 times per week will accomplish the best results, and can often thwart the need for a full dental at your veterinarian's office.

The following are some helpful hints to aid you in your dental routine: Make it a positive experience for your cat. Use a soft voice and praise every good behavior. Wrap your kitty in a towel, much like a cape is used in a beauty shop. This will keep unwanted paws and claws from interfering. Start slow, maybe with just one section of the mouth at each sitting. Depending on your cat's personality and tolerance level, it is better to do less with positive results, than more with disastrous results.

Ok, if all of the above is just too stressful to think about with your wild-child-kitty, then professional help is available. Most veterinarians that have surgery capabilities in their clinics are equipped for cleaning cat teeth. This generally includes scaling of the teeth and extractions. Prices on dentals will vary greatly depending on where you live and the severity of the cat's need for dental care.

If you chose veterinary dental care, expect your veterinarian to possibly do some preliminary blood work if you have an adult or senior cat. Whenever using anesthesia, it is often a good idea to check for problems that may be underlying such as an infection or heart anomalies. You will probably be asked to withhold food and water after midnight, the night before his cleaning. Most dentals are same-day outpatient procedures.

Just remember, the best way to succeed at cleaning cat teeth is to be consistent, positive, and rewarding to your cat. Remember to praise, praise, praise every positive step!

Steve Weber is an avid pet lover and has more information on his web site about cleaning cat teeth.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3770743

Friday, October 11, 2013

Cat and Kitten Diseases

There are many cat and kitten diseases, far too numerous for me to go into at this time, plus the fact I am not too knowledgeable in that area. For now I am going to touch upon some of the more common illnesses your cats may face and ones I am more familiar with.

Pneumonitis: is a cat disease that takes on the symptoms of a human's common cold. It is caused by a virus giving the kitty a runny nose and eyes, along with sneezing and drooling.

It is not a fatal disease, but one that is very uncomfortable for the cat and its caregiver. It is not fatal and can last up to 6 weeks or more. Your vet will prescribe an antihistamine and some antibiotics along with some eye ointment. There is a vaccine for it, however it only lasts for six months and is generally only given if there is a large outbreak in the area where you are.

Urinary Infections: Cats like their human caregivers can suffer from urinary infections, cystitis and even kidney stones. All of which can be very painful.

The symptoms of a urinary infection follow along the same lines as it does for us. Straining to go to the bathroom and nothing happens, blood in the urine when able to urinate.

If your cat starts vomiting and its tummy is bloated and sensitive to your touch that is a sign of a urinary blockage and you need to call your vet immediately.

To be serious for a moment, anytime you notice any sign that your cat is having a problem going to the bathroom call your vet at once.

Swollen or Infected Anal Glands: If you see your cat sliding along your tile floor it can be a sign of one or two things. It might be a symptom of tapeworms or it could be swollen or infected anal glands. These glands are located on either side of the anus on the inside. If the glands are swollen, they need to be emptied.

My suggestion is take your kitty to your vet to have this done. If you are brave, not faint of heart and can stand the smell you can do it, however, I really don't suggest it.

Constipation: This seems to be another problem cats and humans share. A poor diet, little or no exercise, and hairballs can cause constipation in your cat.

If you notice that your cat has not had a bowel movement for a few days, is not eating like it normally does and its tummy is bloated it may be constipated. A quick call to the vet can remedy that.

Your vet may suggest an over the counter remedy you can try or you may have to bring kitty in to see him/her.

It is not a matter of life or death, just a matter of getting kitty more comfortable and getting rid of stuff inside it.

Diarrhea: Diarrhea is the opposite of constipation, it can also be caused by a poor diet, parasites, a change in routine that has upset the cat or some intestinal virus.

Loose stools or a soft bowel movement is not really a sign of diarrhea (even though we humans often consider it that, when it happens to us.) Diarrhea in a cat is really a watery stool or one that is watery and bloody. If blood should appear do not hesitate to take your kitty to the vet, it could be a serious problem.

Feeding your cat some cooked rice mixed with a little of its food or some cottage cheese can sometime control a watery stool.

Think of what you have been feeding your cat. Have you changed its diet to something new? Have you given the cat a special treat? Any of these may be the cause of the problem. If it persists for more than two days call your vet.

Vomiting: My Boots will vomit if he eats too much dry food at one time. Invariably he will do this at night and will find a spot to vomit where I will unknowingly step in it barefoot when I get up at night.

As a general rule cats do not need an excuse to vomit and most of the time it is not anything to worry about. You just clean up the mess. Hairballs seem to be the biggest cause, which is why brushing your cat is a worthwhile endeavor. Feeding your cat once a week a "hairball prevention treat" is a good idea.

However, if you cat vomits consistently it could be worms, poisoning, or an internal problem and your vet should check the cat over. If you suspect poison, rush your cat to the vet at once.




Ear Mites: Ear mites are pesky little crawly things that can get into your cat's ears and cause all kinds of problems. If nothing else they will drive your poor cat crazy as they itch and will cause kitty to dig at its ears.

There are products you can buy at the pet store to use in your cat's ears (that do not always work), but I recommend that before you attempt to play doctor, you call your vet and take kitty in to be certain that is what the problem is.

Feline Diabetes: Feline diabetes seems to be a common ailment among some cats. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that controls the flow of glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body.

Should the insulin be deficient, the cat's body starts to break down the fat and protein that has been stored, in order for it to be used as an alternative energy source.

Symptoms to be on the alert for are: large appetite, eating more, but losing weight, excessive thirst, and frequent urination.

Diabetes is usually found in older obese cats, males are more prone to it than females. If diabetes is not treated it will definitely shorten your cat's life. Your vet will determine the type of treatment, the changes necessary in the cat's diet and the procedure to follow to help your cat lose weight.

Roundworms and hookworms: A mother cat can transmit these critters to a kitten even if the mother has been wormed. Roundworms are long skinny (spaghetti like) worms that can be seen if your kitten vomits or you can see them in the kitten's feces.

Older cats can get them from infected soil. A trip to the vet is necessary to treat these. As these worms can be transmitted to humans.

Make certain you keep the children's sandbox covered, so neighborhood cats will not use it for potty calls. As an added precaution always have the children wash their hands when they come in from playing in the dirt.

Tapeworms: Tapeworms look like little grains of rice and cannot be detected by a fecal examination. They can be noticed on your cat's hair by its tail or even on a carpet.

Tapeworms are not harmful to children or adults and your vet will prescribe a worm medicine for your cat. There are medicines you can buy over the counter, however I am told they do not do a good job and cats do not like the taste. You need to have a medicine your cat will like, cause feeding a cat anything that is distasteful is not fun.

Ringworm: Ringworm is a nasty contagious skin infection that is caused by a fungus. It can be airborne or found in the soil.

It can be transmitted to humans and is a pain to get rid of. If you suspect that your cat has come into contact with the fungus, you will notice it first around your cat's face, ears, and paws. It is circular in appearance and needs to be treated at once by your vet.

It can spread like wildfire and you need to be careful in handling your pet. Definitely keep the children away from the cat.

Hairballs: Hairballs are a part of life when you have a cat. Cats groom themselves and as a result manage to swallow some of their hair.

If your cat has a hairball that it is trying to get rid of, you will certainly know it by the sounds it will make. My Boots would retch, gag and finally vomit, until I realized the problem, I truly thought he was about to die. My solution has been to feed him "Whiskas Temptations" for hairballs. He loves the treat and so far I have not had to go through all those horrible sounds again.

There are other hairball treatments on the market that work well too, like "Petromalt" or "Laxatone."

Longhaired cats really need to be brushed daily to help prevent this problem. If your cat vomits more than once a week, you more than likely need to talk to your vet, as it may not be a hairball problem.

I have tried in these few pages to touch upon a few of the more common cat diseases and cat problems. It is very important that you stay in contact with your vet or other cat health care provider in order to discuss any problems you may have with your cat.

Cats as a general rule are rather healthy. It is very important that you start your kitten off on the right foot with all the necessary shots and that you follow the advice of your vet on general cat care. Feeding a high quality cat food, whether it is a dry food or a wet food is very important in keeping your cat healthy. As the old saying goes "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" and that holds true when raising a kitten into a cat.

If this article has been of benefit, please visit my web site and blog at http://www.cats-and-dogs-on-the-web.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2112485

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Owner's Guide to Cat Chlamydia

Both bacteria and viruses can cause conjunctivitis in cats. This condition is known as pink eye, the same thing that can affect dogs, humans, and other animals. Feline chlamydia results from a bacterial infection. Cats are usually infected with other viruses along with this disease like herpes virus and calicivirus.

Chlamydia in cats usually affects those at the younger or older end of the spectrum. Those with damaged immune systems or other illness of some sort have an increased risk too. However, the bacterial infection can cause symptoms in any cat.

 

cat chlamydia symptoms
There is an assortment of ways that feline chlamydia can be transmitted. The bacteria can be passed via eye discharge, nose secretions, or saliva from infected cats. Mothers are also capable of transmitting the disease to their kittens while giving birth.

You should also know that it's possible chlamydia in cats to be transmitted in indirect ways. The bacteria can live in bedding, food dishes, and other places and can infect your cat if he comes into contact with them. Owners can also harbor the bacteria on their hands and pass it along to their felines.

Seeing the white of your cat's eyes turn red is one of the primary signs of feline chlamydia. The eye may also swell, with the third eyelid closing partially. Discharge that's very watery may also appear from the eyes. All of this will irritate your cat's eye, causing him to paw at it frequently. This illness may only cause symptoms in one eye at first. Eventually though, both eyes will likely experience problems. As mentioned, chlamydia in cats usually occurs at the same time as other respiratory conditions. Cats may have a fever, discharge from the nose, coughing, and sneezing if this occurs.

Feline chlamydia doesn't usually prove difficult to treat as long as it's mild. Antibiotics can get rid of the bacteria. They may be given orally or placed directly in the affected eyes. The condition can get more problematic though if there are other problems at the same time. Your cat may have an upper respiratory illness that requires hospitalization.

Whenever giving your cat antibiotics to treat any condition, it's vital to go through the entire regimen. If you don't, then the bacteria you're trying to get rid of may mutate and grow stronger. If this happens, they may become resistant to the antibiotics.

If you have multiple cats in your household, then you'll especially need to be careful with feline chlamydia. It can easily be transmitted to other cats. Keep infected cats in seclusion. Disinfect bedding, food dishes, and other places that can harbor the bacteria. Also, make sure that you wash your hands thoroughly after you touch the infected cat so that you don't spread it to your other felines.

Hopefully, you're aware that there are many different conditions that can affect your cat such as rhinotracheitis in cats. Learning this information will help you recognize signs of disease quickly. To learn about some of these cat diseases, click over to common-cat-diseases.com today.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7358023

Monday, September 30, 2013

10 Tips to Recover Your Lost Pet

When looking for a missing dog or cat, time is of the essence. The faster you get out there looking for your missing pet, the higher the chances of finding them. If you don't know where to begin, here is a list of ten things to do as soon as you know your beloved pet is missing:

1. Search your neighborhood - Many times, dogs and cats may run away but stay in the familiar zone of their own neighborhood. Walk around calling out your pet's names loudly in case they are around but scared or confused.

 

Lost Pet
2. Keep an updated picture of your pet - You will need this to use on posters or advertisements announcing your pet's disappearance. The photo should be clear and upclose to get the best results.

3. Ask around - It might help to actually approach your neighbors and ask if they have seen your pet lately. The more people who know your missing pet is missing, the greater the chances of it being found.

4. Post 'missing' posters - Tack these up everywhere in a 10-mile radius. Put them up in grocery stores, near stoplights, community centers, vets, and even pet stores. Include a photo, your telephone number and if possible, the promise of a reward for your returned cat or dog.

5. Advertise in your local paper and online - Place an ad in the local paper and include a thorough description of your pet and how you can be contacted best if anyone spots your dog or cat. Many people now turn to the Internet to help find their missing pets. You can post an ad on a number of sites such as craiglist.com and petfinder.com. The Internet is a great resource to increase your chances of having your pet returned.

6. Visit local shelters and pet rescue centers - Physically visit all pet shelters within a 60-mile radius. If your dog has not returned in a few days continue to visit the shelters routinely. Keep in mind your dog might be dirty and matted and now be unrecognizable from his or her photo, so a personal identification is the safest option. Shelters also rarely keep an animal for more than 72 hours, which again illustrates the importance of time.

7. Check with the local police or highway patrol - As unbearable as it is to consider, you need to check with the local authorities to find out if any accidents have occurred involving a pet.

8. Be mindful of pet recovery scams - Never volunteer extra information to a stranger who calls claiming information about your pet's whereabouts. Ask him to describe your pet in detail and be sure the identification marks are not just the ones you have stated on posters and in ads, in order to make sure the caller is legit. Never believe anyone who asks for money to be wired for the return of your missing pet.

9. Think about IDs - Implanted microchips have been around for a while now; unfortunately these microchips are usually limited to a range of about half a mile and are fairly ineffective. With microchips, implantation has to be done by a trained professional and many are averse to putting their pets through this trauma.

10. Prevent your dog from going missing by investing in a GPS Pet Tracking Collar - Fit your dog with A-GPS dog collar - a pre-programmed transmitter that informs the owner when his pet has strayed from designated safety zones. Through the GPS system you will be alerted if your animal has moved away from these areas, and it updates you of the dog's current location allowing for quicker retrieval.

SpotLight is the next stair in providing recovery services for your pets. It offers total peace of mind in knowing that your dog is always being monitored, no matter where you are. You can now relax knowing that you are always connected to your pet and their location. Created and developed in coalition with the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery (AKC CAR) team to reduce the number of lost dogs, buying a SpotLight Pet Locator includes an exclusive AKC CAR collar tag with unique ID number, which includes Lifetime enrollment in AKC CAR's Recovery Service as well. The rescue button on the device connects you with your lost dog and a trained recovery team as part of the service. Thanks to the 24/7 AKC CAR helpline, there is always someone there to watch and help if your dog is missing.

This article is Co-authored by Chris Newton & Lewis Sheats, from Securus, Inc. For more information about GPS Pet Tracking System, visit http://www.spotlightgps.com/.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3336878

Friday, September 27, 2013

Different Types of GPS Trackers For Pets

GPS trackers are devices or gadgets that provide point to point information about the person or object that it is attached to. In earlier years, these devices were used only by government agencies for purposes of gathering various information. However, with the advent of advancements in electronics and technology, GPS tracking devices can now be used by civilians as well, for a variety of purposes. These devices can now even be used in tracking pets. In order to work perfectly with pets, these trackers have been embedded in various things that pets can use.

 

Trackers for Cats
GPS Pet Collars

GPS collars are probably the most common gps tracking device that are available in the market. It is also the most commonly used tracking device by pet owners. There are various companies that manufacture GPS collars and each of these manufacturers offer special features for their device. There are those that have a battery-saving feature on the collar part. There are also those that have modifiable signals, allowing the pet owner to narrow or widen the range diameter to several feet. There are also those that have strobe lights that switches on when activated, allowing the owner to still identify and locate his pet despite wandering off to a certain distance. Receivers for these tracking devices also have different special features. For instance, there are receivers that also serve as the collar's charger. There are GPS tracking devices that do not make use of a cellular phone modem but rather makes use of MURS (154.60 MHz). This is a particularly economically useful feature because it saves the owner from paying for additional monthly communication costs.

GPS Halters

There are also GPS halters that can be worn on pets in order to track its location, in case it gets lost. Again, there are different special features on this kind of pet tracker, depending on the manufacturer. There are those that finds the pet within a mile, regardless of what direction went to. There are those that can display a pet's exact location, as well as its current velocity and movement. There are those that are very user-friendly and does not require installation.

GPS Knapsacks

There are also GPS knapsacks, although these are less common when compared to GPS collars. There are those that periodically send the pet's location to the owner controlling the receiver. There are trackers that contain a number of features on the receiver, including a memory card slot, an area calculator, a waterproof exterior and a lot of other special features.

Trackers for Cats

Currently, most GPS tracking devices fit very well for dogs, but not for cats. This is because most GPS devices are still too heavy for cats to carry. Hopefully, with the rapid advancements in technology, GPS trackers that cats can carry well will be available in the near future.

This article only shows a few examples of GPS tracking devices that are designed to be used for pets, dogs specifically. There may still be a number of specialized tracking devices that are available in the market. Read more about pet GPS trackers or GPS tracking devices in general at Strongman Security or at SafeSecure24.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6479914

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Feeding Cats The Proper Diet For A Healthy Life

Cats need a balanced diet that includes proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water. Proteins supply important elements for energy, growth and body repair. Fats provide a highly digestible, tasty, concentrated source of energy and aid the production of healthy skin and fur. Cats should drink large quantities of water (about one ounce for each pound of body weight daily) and should be given free access to clean, fresh water throughout the day.

A few general principles guide the feeding of a healthy cat:

To provide a well balanced diet and prevent picky eating, feed your cat a variety of styles and flavors.

 

Feeding Cats Diet
1. Read cat food labels carefully. Avoid foods with additives or very high vegetable content. Compare the cost per feeding of different brands of food.

2. Examine cat food and cat carefully. Does the food look smooth and digestible, free of skin, bones and discolored meat? Does your cat appear healthy and disease-free after eating the food?

Commercial food makes up the bulk of a cat's diet and exists in three forms: Dry, semi moist and canned (moist). Dry foods (about 10% water) help clean the teeth and are cost efficient, but lack the necessary water and fat content to be a single food source. Semi moist food (25% to 35% water) stays fresh longer than dry food, but costs more, does nothing for cleaning teeth and usually contains chemical additives to retain a moist texture. This kind of cat food should be given occasionally and in small amounts. Canned food (about 75% water) store well, tastes good and conforms to a cat's naturally dietary needs, but costs more and may contain additives. A healthy diet combines dry and canned food, providing the nutritional advantages of each.

Food quantities are determined by your cat's size. Cats need about 40 calories for each pound of body weight every day. Active, pregnant, lactating and unneutered cats require more, obese, inactive and older cats may require less. About a ½ cup of dry food and 6 ounces of canned food for every 5 pounds of body weight generally satisfied your cat's daily needs. Cats should be fed at least twice a day or given free access to their food.

You can supplement commercial food with cooked liver (once or twice a week) and small amounts of cheese, milk, fruit, vegetable and cooked fish. Dry food and low fat canned foods (less than 5%) may need vegetable oil or lard added, but limits the fat addition to 1 teaspoon per day. Some adult cats enjoy (but do not require) catnip and owners often find that a potted catnip plant discourages the nibbling of houseplants. A balanced diet usually provides all of the necessary vitamins and minerals, so consult with your veterinarian before adding a supplement to the diet.

Young kittens have special needs and require a high calorie, very high protein diet that must be eaten in small, frequent meals. You can "free-feed" your cat by leaving food out all day or "hand-feed" five to six small meals. Many owners find that "free-feeding" insures that the kitten eats enough and prevents feeding boredom. Others find that "hand-feeding" prevents obesity and lets you monitor the kitten's eating. As kittens mature, their calorie intake should diminish and you should seek professional advice to establish a proper feeding schedule.

Always discuss dramatic changes in the diet you provide or your cat's eating habits with a veterinarian.

For more great tips on cat grooming, visit our cat grooming page as well our site - http://www.cathealtharticles.com
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5784719

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

My Cat Eats Grass - So What's the Big Deal?

I've owned lots of cats my whole life. Two things I know for sure is that they sure are finicky and they love to eat grass. What I also know is that they never got sick just from eating grass. It's what they do. So really why do they do it?

There are lots of reasons they want to eat the grass and many pet owners feel they need to stop or prevent them from doing so. They feel since there cat isn't a cow why let them do it. They also think that after seeing them do it the first time, besides being odd it only makes them throw up anyway. Unfortunately since kitty can't talk we can only watch and theorize about the whys.
 

Cat Eats Grass
What people tend to forget is that this is a pet, not a cat from the wild. It's a natural instinct for them to graze and then throw up right after they chow down. This is especially true for cats that are not just confined to being a house cat. Outdoor cats will eat just about anything they can catch and this is just one of the reasons they "need" to eat the grass.

One of my cats loved to catch and eat field mice. He wasn't particular about what he ate so he pretty much ate the whole thing. There are lots of parts that he ate that he could not digest. Although some of this indigestible material would take nature's course and pass through his system a lot could not.

So how does a cat get rid of materials in their stomach so it doesn't continue to cause discomfort or worse yet some type of obstruction? They eat grass to make themselves throw up. It's really not a big deal for them. I'm pretty sure they don't enjoy it but it's also part of their natural instincts to do so. It's a cycle of removal they go through during the natural processing of their food.

Cats will throw up whatever they can't pass. One of the most important thing is does is remove fur balls from their system. During the natural cleaning process of their coat their very rough tongue does a great job of removing not only any dirt or mess but retains lots of hair. It forms large fur balls in their stomach. If not removed or passed they cat the pet a lot of discomfort.

Since Cats almost continuously clean themselves they need to have an outlet for removing these fur balls. In the absence of grass they need something to take its place. fur ball additives for their pet foods are available for this if need be. One of the best things I found to aid them in getting rid of the fur in their stomach is to give them some type of oil with their food. But a lot of cats do not like this and even if they do be sure not to overdo it.

My cat used to only eat dry cat food. He didn't care for any of the wet products. Even though I moistened it to his liking it didn't help pass the fur he would ingest. I saved tuna fish oil and would give it to him. He got a tablespoon about every 2nd or 3rd day. This helped him pass the fur naturally through his system. Besides that he loved the taste.

Grass won't harm your pet and they may actually like eating it. Just watch that it is not full of insecticides. It could harm them in the long run if it contains any toxins.

Like anything else if it is a continuous thing, a brand new behavior, or if they constantly throw up this may be a sign of a completely different problem. A trip or at least a phone call to your vet may be in order. They may want to have the pet brought in or a few questions may give you're the answers to ease your mind.

Cats are awesome but tremendously secretative. Finding out about them a little more in depth will help you and your feline get closer.

Get "Ultimate Cat Secrets" that will help you understand them and just maybe they'll understand you better too!

Copyright Cinova LLC - 2009

Pick up all your name brand pet meds at www.fleaandtickcontrol-shop.com for great savings!
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3553231

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Hairballs in Cats: Prevention Is the Answer

Hairballs in cats are an all too common problem for cats as well as their cat parents. No cat or owner wants to deal with a gross hairball find on the floor but, it is part of life with a cat. So, what causes these nasty hair byproducts and how do we prevent hairballs in cats? Let's first look at what causes hairballs.

Hairballs in Cats
Felines are by nature very clean animals. They give themselves and other cats in the home daily baths. When a cat grooms herself or her fellow felines dead hairs on their coats get stuck on the tinny bumps that line their tongues. These hairs then get swallowed and end up in their stomachs. Normally these hairs pass on through their digestive tract. However, when the hair gets stuck in their stomachs, a hairball is formed.

The only way a feline can get this mess of fur out of their stomachs is to cough it up and out. To do this, you cat will sit or stand in place making retching, coughing, and vomiting noise until the hair ball comes out. Owners find these long, tube shaped, off color, messes of hair on the floor. Hacking up a hairball is a normal part of life for a cat.If your cat acts like she is trying to product a hairball but with no results, this can indicate a medical problem for your feline friend. Occasionally, hairballs get stuck in you cats stomach or intestines and form a blockage. In addition to your cat making retching noise without producing a hairball she may also have a lack of appetite, diarrhea, lethargy, or constipation. If you suspect you cat has a hairball causing a blockage in your cat, take her the Veterinarian quickly. Only a Veterinarian will be able to deal with this life threatening condition.

Thankfully, there are a few ways to prevent you cat from having a hairball. The best way to prevent her from producing a nasty hairball is to brush her coat daily. By brushing her coat, dead hairs are collected on the brush. Thus, these hairs in up on the trash can instead of your cats stomach.

Long hair cats are most likely to develop hairballs. Consider not only daily brushing of your long hair cat but taking her to the groomer every six months. A trained groomer can shorten her hair there by leaving less hair to get stuck in your cats stomach during her normal grooming.

By following these simple preventive measures, you and your cat will be hairball free. No more retching for her and no nasty finds for you. Best of all, there is no need for expensive hairball treatments.

Justin Hayes is a cat aficionado from Dallas, Texas. His interests range from cats to UFO's and everything in between.
To lean more about how to prevent hairballs in cats and treatment options for hairballs visit his article: http://crazycatman.hubpages.com/hub/Hairballs-in-Cats-How-to-treat-and-prevent-hairballs-in-cats
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6727990

Friday, September 20, 2013

Cat Sick After Eating? 7 Reasons Why Your Cat Might Be Vomiting

It's gross and it's scary. It's cat puke!

But don't worry, it's very common. I have two cats (Tini and Cheddar) and both have had puking spells before. But eventually it passes, once the reason has been found out. All cats at one point or another will throw up. But let's make sure it's nothing serious first.

But if you see blood in your cat's stool, a fever, or diarrhea, it may be time to go see a vet.

1. Stuck Hairball


Hairballs are a common occurrence. Most of the time they'll pass without much notice but when the hairball is too big and much too matted, your cat will bring it up the only way he can: by throwing up. This can happen right after eating because as they're trying to get the food past that hair blockage, it's just not working so instead the poor cat hurls up everything. Check the vomit for hair to double check that this is indeed a hairball issue. If it is, then spend more time grooming your cat.

 

Cat Eating Grass
2. Eating Grass or Plants

Cats often ingest copious amounts of plants. To be on the safe side, keep your cat indoors and make sure all your plants and flowers out of your cat's reach.

3. Change In Diet

If you change your cat's diet too quickly, your cat's stomach won't be ready for it. Since cats are slaves to routine, the enzymes and bacteria within your cat's digestive track may not be ready for the drastic switch. If you have changed your cat's diet, switch back to the old food and gradually introduce the new food a little bit at a time.

4. Overeating

Cat sick after eating? Then take the time to monitor your cat's eating habits. At least for a few weeks.

You've felt this before. You're at a hotel buffet and before you know it, you're passed out on your bed nursing a stomach ache. This happens to cats too and on some occasions, they'll throw up. Regulate your cat's mealtimes as well as how much they eat. Some cats eat much too fast for their own good and don't realize they're full till it's too late.

5. Poisons

Cats are relatively independent creatures and as such we feel comfortable leaving them alone at home. But we forget that they can be incredibly curious. Your cat may have gotten into your cleaning closet and ingested some cleaning detergent, soap, or oil. Even alcohol can make your cat puke. Double check your cleaning agents and make sure there was no way your cat could have gotten into it.

6. Cheap Cat Food

Cheap cat food is filled with filler, food dye, and unknown "meat". This kind of cardboard cat food isn't good and probably has low protein content. Stuff like food dye and filler can be hard on your cat's digestive track and is much harder to digest. Switch from cheap, generic cat food to one made specifically for your cat's age group and type. Ensure it's AAFCO (Association Of American Feed Control Officials) approved or at least by another government agency. I know you'll want to save money but having a cat sick after eating is no fun for anyone.

7. Gastrointestinal Issues

There are a variety of digestive issues: gastritis, colitis, worms, or pancreatitis. The only way to be sure is to go see a vet and get your cat completely checked out.

When you see your vet, report on your cat's bowel movements, eating habits, and any change in behaviour.

Hope this helps you figure out your cat's puking spell. It can be scary but in many cases it's harmless or treatable.

Gabrielle Lim - I love cats! My two, Tini and Cheddar, are my little babies so I thought I'd share some of my experience of raising two very different cats with you.

They're 13 and 14 and have been through a cornucopia of cat problems and kitty health issues. One's from Canada and the other's from Malaysia.
For more tips and articles on cat training and cat health, check out TheDailyMew.com.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5777401

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Cat Care Tips - Info on Cat Enteritis

Enteritis is a very serious disease for cats. It's often referred to as distemper, which is a disease that dogs commonly get. However, cat enteritis isn't the same. A common other name for the condition is panleukopenia.

This disease normally strikes kittens younger than six months old. However, older cats also have a relatively increased risk of developing it. Older cats may be strong enough to fight off the affliction, but kittens can easily succumb to it.

 
serious disease for cats
Cat enteritis is caused by a virus. Wild animals such as cats and raccoons can harbor the highly contagious virus. Infected animals can pass it to your cat by coming into direct contact with him. If your cat comes into contact with nasal or oral secretions, he can get infected too.

Owners should also know that the virus that causes enteritis can also contaminate items such as bedding, litter boxes, and food dishes. Owners can also pass the virus along to their cats because it's capable of contaminating human hands.

After being infected with cat enteritis, your cat may not show any symptoms for up to ten days. Common signs include high fever and loss of appetite. Cats may also vomit frequently, producing yellow-tinted bile in the process. If you touch your cat in the abdominal region, he may cry out in pain. It is also common for cats to have diarrhea and produce stool that also has a yellow color, although it may appear to have blood in it instead.

As mentioned, enteritis is quite serious. That's why it is important that you get your cat checked out and diagnosed with the condition as soon as possible. The chances of your cat surviving a bout with this virus rise considerably the earlier that treatment is started.

There is no way to battle the virus that causes cat enteritis directly. The vet will simply need to provide supportive measures to help your cat make it through the disease. Antibiotics will likely be given to stave off any bacterial infections. IV fluids and nutrition therapy may also be necessary.

It is very easy to prevent this disease. Simply have your feline vaccinated. The virus can live virtually anywhere in your home, so your kitten would be at risk if left unvaccinated. Using a standard disinfectant won't be enough to kill the virus either.

If your cat survives an episode of cat enteritis, then you should be aware that he will continue to shed the virus for a few weeks. Other cats in the household can easily be infected. The good news is that cats that survive an infection from the virus will be relatively safe from reinfection since their immune system will be boosted.

Your furry friend can be affected by many different conditions like aids in cats. Learning this information will help you recognize signs of disease quickly. To learn about some of these cat health problems, click over to common-cat-diseases.com today.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7364054

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Benefits of GPS Pet Tracking

Our pets soon become our extended family members and when a cat or dog goes missing, the trauma and stress involved is immense. Not knowing where to look and what to do to when your pet is lost is frustrating and not tracking them down in those all-important first few hours of being missing can even be fatal. However, thanks to the new wave of GPS pet-tracking devices, tracking and recovering your lost pets has become a whole lot simpler.

 



Basically, A-GPS Pet Tracking system uses the same assisted global positioning satellite (A-GPS) technology that we use in our automobiles today. A transmitter is attached to the dog's collar and once activated, informs the owner of the pet's location through email or text alerts. Some devices allow you to pre-program designated safe spots such as your home or backyard, and when your dog leaves these areas you are immediately informed of the same, thus saving precious time in tracking the pet down. Since it uses GPS technology, you would be able to receive not only the location of your missing pet, but also instructions and directions on how to get there.

Some pet tracking devices are associated with a recovery center that is alerted once the animal goes missing and in this way, a combination of efforts take place for the tracking and recovery of your lost pet. The device is fitted with a bright LED beacon that is visible from over 100 yards, which is especially useful when your dog goes missing at night. Unlike some other devices on the market, you do not need to replace the entire device when the battery no longer works, as it is easily removable and comes with a rechargeable battery.

SpotLight is one of the smallest GPS devices available on the market today, is water resistant and built to last. Using the latest technology and Google Maps, pet owners can now track and find their missing pets in no time.

SpotLight is the next step in providing recovery services for your pets. It offers total peace of mind since your dog is always being monitored, no matter where you are. You can now relax knowing that you are always connected to your pet and that they are safe. Most competitors offer dog tags, call centers, tattoos, microchips or just tracking capabilities. However, SpotLight is a dedicated 24 hour, year round service. Created and developed in conjunction with the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery (AKC CAR) team to reduce the number of lost dogs, buying a SpotLight GPS Pet Locator includes an exclusive AKC CAR collar tag with unique ID number that includes Lifetime enrollment in AKC CAR's Recovery Service as well. The rescue button on the device connects you with your lost dog and a trained recovery team as part of the service. Thanks to the 24/7 AKC CAR helpline, there is always someone there to watch and help if your dog is missing.

As a pet owner, there can be nothing more important than the safety and security of your pet. To prevent your dog from running away and increasing the risk of an accident or being stolen, A GPS dog collar such as the SpotLight GPS Pet Locator is a worthwhile investment. Such a device can save you not just a lot of time and heartache but also help reduce the number of stray dogs on the streets and in the shelters as a result of effective recovery.

This article is Co-authored by Christopher Newton & Lewis Sheats, from Positioning Animals Worldwide, Inc. For more information about GPS Pet Tracking System, visit http://www.spotlightgps.com/spotlight-gps-pet-locator.aspx.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3193491

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Why Owners Should Consider GPS Tracking for Protecting Their Pets

In today's society, 62% of U.S. households have pets. In most cases, those pets are considered a loved member of the family and often treated like children.

It is no wonder that pet owners are doing what they can to take their pets safety more seriously.

With pets being taken and mistreated only to be left astray, owners are looking for more reliable ways to protect their pets.

Animal Statistics


Of the 62% of household pets in the U.S. 78 million are dogs, while 86 million are cats. Just think, there are more than 70 million stray cats roaming free on the streets.

When it comes to companion animals (pets) that are lost each year:

    5 - 7 million companion animals are sheltered annually
    3 - 4 million companion animals euthanized annually (60% dogs/ 70% cats)
    15 - 20% of companion animals are returned to their owners (had tattoo's, id's, or microchip)

Benefits to Using a GPS Tracker as Pet Locator


Pet owners are learning there are benefits to using a GPS tracker as a pet locator:

    Prevent pets from becoming lost or stolen
    Prevent shelter fees by tracking and locating your own pet
    Geofence protection can alert you the moment your pet is out of their designated area
    Software is user-friendly

Reasons Pets Become Lost

Understanding how and why pets become lost is the key to prevention.

The following is a list of the top four reasons pets become lost:

    Opportunity: Door left open, gate left open
    Curiosity: Digging under a fence, darting past an owner
    Panic: Loud noises, thunder, lightening
    Theft

Making sure you close the door or gate behind you can help to prevent a pet from wandering off.

If you see where they have been digging under a fence, take precautions to fill the hole and provide a barrier preventing your pet from being able to reach the other side.

Try creating as much white noise as possible for your pet. This may help with desensitization.

When your pet experiences loud noises give them a massage to help them to relax.

Doing this while playing a CD of loud noises at increasing volume over a period of days will help your pet to better adapt to the loud noises in the future.

To prevent theft, some pet owners have opted for the chip. Others are touting the praises of GPS tracking using locator collars, while others aren't quite as convinced.

Past Complaints About Using GPS Devices for Companion Animals

Pet tracking using GPS tracking devices is a simple and efficient way to keep tabs of your furry friends. Some complaints owners have expressed over using GPS technology to track their pets are:

    Device battery doesn't last long enough
    Digital maps are complicated to use
    Range isn't far enough

Though this may have been the case years ago, technology has greatly improved over just the last few months.

Improvements to battery life, maps, and data range have made pet locator collars using GPS technology that much more attractive for keeping the family pet safe and sound.

Being able to establish such GPS alerts as geofencing provides owners with the ability to establish a geographic boundary for their pet.

If for any reason their pet goes outside of their predetermined geofence, the owner will be sent an alert by email and/or text.

This will help to improve the chances of recovering their pet before they are picked up and taken to a nearby shelter, thus saving owners from paying unnecessary fees.

Statistical data provided by ASPCA.

L.A. Turner is the GPS Press Contact for GPSTrackit dot com. With a passion for news, safety, and all things green she is bringing the internet news about GPS tracking, vehicle location, asset monitoring and protection and more.
Looking to protect your personal property, pets, and family? View your solutions here.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7068173

Monday, September 9, 2013

Different Types of GPS Trackers For Pets

GPS trackers are devices or gadgets that provide point to point information about the person or object that it is attached to. In earlier years, these devices were used only by government agencies for purposes of gathering various information. However, with the advent of advancements in electronics and technology, GPS tracking devices can now be used by civilians as well, for a variety of purposes. These devices can now even be used in tracking pets. In order to work perfectly with pets, these trackers have been embedded in various things that pets can use.
 

GPS Pet Collars

GPS collars are probably the most common gps tracking device that are available in the market. It is also the most commonly used tracking device by pet owners. There are various companies that manufacture GPS collars and each of these manufacturers offer special features for their device. There are those that have a battery-saving feature on the collar part. There are also those that have modifiable signals, allowing the pet owner to narrow or widen the range diameter to several feet. There are also those that have strobe lights that switches on when activated, allowing the owner to still identify and locate his pet despite wandering off to a certain distance. Receivers for these tracking devices also have different special features. For instance, there are receivers that also serve as the collar's charger. There are GPS tracking devices that do not make use of a cellular phone modem but rather makes use of MURS (154.60 MHz). This is a particularly economically useful feature because it saves the owner from paying for additional monthly communication costs.

GPS Halters

There are also GPS halters that can be worn on pets in order to track its location, in case it gets lost. Again, there are different special features on this kind of pet tracker, depending on the manufacturer. There are those that finds the pet within a mile, regardless of what direction went to. There are those that can display a pet's exact location, as well as its current velocity and movement. There are those that are very user-friendly and does not require installation.

GPS Knapsacks

There are also GPS knapsacks, although these are less common when compared to GPS collars. There are those that periodically send the pet's location to the owner controlling the receiver. There are trackers that contain a number of features on the receiver, including a memory card slot, an area calculator, a waterproof exterior and a lot of other special features.

Trackers for Cats

Currently, most GPS tracking devices fit very well for dogs, but not for cats. This is because most GPS devices are still too heavy for cats to carry. Hopefully, with the rapid advancements in technology, GPS trackers that cats can carry well will be available in the near future.

This article only shows a few examples of GPS tracking devices that are designed to be used for pets, dogs specifically. There may still be a number of specialized tracking devices that are available in the market. Read more about pet GPS trackers or GPS tracking devices in general at Strongman Security or at SafeSecure24.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6479914

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Easy Persian Cats Care Tips

Every pet owner knows that like any animals, cats need our attention and should not be physically harmed. Most cat breeds are very easy to take care but Persian cats require special attention. Persian cats have long and soft fur so most would think that shedding would be a problem. But unlike other long furred animals, Persian cats shed minimally. This is one reason why they are favored inside the house. Taking care of these cats will not be a hassle as long as you follow simple Persian cats care tips.

 

Persian Cats
Yes, Persian cat does not shed a lot but because of its long furs, they tend to get in the way of what the cat is doing. One problem with its fur is that when your cat poops, some of it sticks to its fur making the cat look dirty and smell bad too. Another problem is that it easily gets mats on its fur which makes it annoying for both you and the cat to get rid of.

To prevent these fur problems, make sure you comb its fur and not brush it. Brushing is not as effective as combing the fur because it leaves some dead fur on the undercoat. Combing its fur daily prevents the fur to tangle with one another. You can also have its fur cut into a lion clip. Its fur will be similar to the lion's fur. This will remove the fur around its rectum which will prevent the poop from sticking on it. These are some of the basic Persian cat care tips which should be done by the owner regularly.

Here are some Persian cat care tips:

1. Do not play with your cat using your hand especially when the game involves biting. Use toxic free toys instead of your hand to prevent biting habits and avoid unwanted injuries.

2. Keep small objects like coins, pins, eraser and matches away from the cat's reach. When eaten, it may cause serious injuries to your cat. They might choke on it while others are simply poisonous to your cat.

3. Cats are naturally curious so they tend to lick and smell anything that will trigger their curiosity. So bear in mind to keep soaps, detergents or any hazardous chemicals in a closed storage. It is also best to keep your cat in its cage when you are cleaning the house.

4. Do not allow your cat to over eat. This will cause obesity, vomiting and other health problems. Feed your cat at a specific time. Do not allow your cat to have access to its food whenever it wishes by leaving its bowl full every time.

5. Do not let your cat wander outside your property. Your cat might get into fights, run over by a car or stolen by other people. Always accompany your cat when walking outside.

Cats have precious life that should be treasured. These Persian cat care tips are important to keep your Persian cat happy, healthy and safe from harm.

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Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5654067

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

The Benefits of a GPS Tracking System For Pets

Did you know a GPS tracking system is a fantastic idea if your pet gets lost? Or if you live on a large, rural property and your dogs roam freely, you can know where they are at any given moment. How about if you go hunting, hiking or some other outdoor activity where your dog would be off its leash?

Some pets are excellent escape artists just waiting to bolt out the front door whenever it's open. In all of these situations, a GPS tracking system would be the ideal answer to a misplaced pet.

This device can be attached very easily to a pet's harness or collar. GPS stands for global positioning system, and it works by picking up signals from cellular towers and satellites as they orbit in space. Some of these devices are so unique they can even supply text and email alerts to notify you of your dog's location.

These devices make sense for any concerned pet owner. Most units will vary in cost and complexity of operation. But it also must be noted that no device such as this should ever or can ever replace the security of a firm leash and a fenced in yard.

They work well for cats too. The only drawback is that if your cat gets trapped in a building or underneath something, the signal may get "hampered" and not be sufficient for you to locate it easily. A GPS tracking system which includes the ability to use signals from cellular towers can produce much more excellent reliability. Look for "A-GPS or Assisted GPS" if you desire this cellular capability. Tracing devices with cellular ability will require a monthly fee just like cell phones.

When buying this device for your cat, be sure to make sure it is for cats. The units for a dog's collar are generally too heavy for a cat's collar. The maximum extra weight on a cat's collar is about 1.5 ounces or 40 grams.

Unlike a GPS tracking system, in both dog and cat radio-transmitter devices, your pet will wear a tiny transmitter attached to the collar. You'll be able to locate your pet with a small handheld receiver.

The beep will be louder nearer the location. The drawback to radio-transmitter devices is their limited range of 100 feet to one mile depending on where you're searching. It stands to reason if the terrain is a wide-open area the signal will be louder and extend further.

To even just operate some radio-transmitter devices, you are even required to get an amateur radio operators license from the FCC. It's easy to see, a GPS tracking system that employs the use of cellular or satellite power is the better choice.

The capability of locating a lost pet was at one time a very costly and technical process. Nowadays, it's easily accessible to anyone who wants to keep their pet as safe and secure as possible.

Whether if is for your pet or for your fleet of vehicles, a gps tracking system helps you stay informed and in the loop with where your possessions are. For more information, visit http://www.tracknetonline.com.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7747991

Friday, August 23, 2013

GPS Cat Tracking Collars Can Be Hard To Find

Cat GPS tracking collars seem like a great idea for keeping tabs on your wandering feline. Outfit a tracking collar with a global positioning device that knows its current location at all times. The GPS device can then periodically send its longitude and latitude position to some base station by simply transmitting it over the cellular phone network. Once received, the location information is uploaded to a website which allows you to monitor your cat's location. Not only is this GPS tracking system a good idea, it's already being used in a variety of ways -- from car navigation systems to locating lost hikers.

However, the typical GPS cat tracking system is difficult to locate -- at least in the United States. The main problem is that GPS technology has not been miniaturized to the point of making GPS cat collars small enough and light enough for most household cats. Domestic cats are simply unable to bear the weight of the current GPS electronics and power supply.

The only websites that advertise GPS cat tracking collars seem to be located in Europe, and those particular European devices are fairly large -- weighing over 90g. Most average sized cats would only be able to carry an 80g tracking collar comfortably.

The other downside to GPS tracking collars, and this goes for both cat tracking collars and dog tracking collars, is that GPS collars typically have monthly fees associated with them. This is because the GPS collars will normally utilize the cellular phone networks for transmitting location information and the cellular networks all have monthly charges. So if you wish to avoid monthly fees you will have to use another type of technology for the cat tracking collar.

One of the best options that I have found is to use a short range radio tracking collar. This kind of tracking collar transmits a periodic beacon signal that is detected by a directional receiver. With the receiver you are able to tell in which direction your cat is located by how strong a signal you are detecting. In addition, as you get closer to the radio collar the beacon signal also gets stronger so you can determine both the relative direction and distance to your cat.

These short range radio cat tracking collars have two distinct advantages over the cat GPS collars. First, because they use free radio frequencies you avoid the monthly cellular network fees used by the GPS systems. Second, the electronics used with these short range devices can be made small and light enough for any domestic cat to wear. The tracking system on the collar only has to beacon a weak signal so the amount of electronics and power requirements are low. These types or cat tracking collars just need a small coin battery for power.

There is one disadvantage to using a radio tracking collar. Unlike the cat GPS locators you would not be able to pinpoint the longitude and latitude of your cat since the radio collar does not transmit any exact location coordinates -- just distance and directional information that you can detect via the relative signal strength with the directional receiver. However, since cats usually do not wander miles away in a short time span -- my cats are usually within a block of my house -- having exact location information to track on a website does not seem as critical in my view.

The other perceived disadvantage of a short range radio cat locator collar is that it will not work over long distances as compared to the GPS collar. That is only partially true. While a GPS collar that is using the cellular network may be able to transmit location information over a longer distance, cellular network systems are also susceptible to interference and signal loss. If your cat should wander into a hole or a cave or some area that is not being serviced by a cellular tower, then the GPS collar would not work.

A short range radio collar would be able to work in much more remote areas and in places where the cellular phone networks cannot reach since the radio collar only needs to transmit as far as the receiver while the GPS cat collar needs to transmit to the nearest cellular tower.

So consider a radio cat collar as a cat tracking device if you cannot find a cat GPS collar that fits your needs and budget.

Ken Harrison owns two cats and they both wear cat tracking collars. See http://www.mycattrackingcollars.com for more pet tracking information.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1117827